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Volume 6 | In the Dust of the Rabbi

Learning to Live as Jesus Lived

Runtime of this lesson: 2:23 minutes2005


During his ministry in Israel, Jesus called and trained disciples, His "talmidim." Their job would eventually be to bring His message of redemption to all the nations, Jew and Gentile. What would happen when they began to make disciples of their own and the gospel began to spread to a Greek and Roman world, to cultures completely unfamiliar with the God of the Jews? Follow the rabbi through Israel and Turkey as you explore what it meant to be the message of Jesus to all nations.

Purchase Discovery Guide

1 When the Rabbi Says "Come"
2 When the Rabbi Says "Go"
3 The Presence of God - A Countercultural Community
4 Living Stones
5 The Very Words of God

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